Omantribune
Oman Tribune
Omantribune
Omantribune Search News
Web Oman
    Google Search Button
      Tribune
- Oman
- Soccer World Cup
- Other Top Stories
- Middle East
- Business
- Sports
- India
- Pakistan
- Asia
- Europe
- Americas
- Columnists
- Editorial
- Oman Mirror
- Special Features
- Cinema
- PDF Pages
- Weather
- Travel
- Currency Rate
- Hospitals
- Pharmacies
- Services
- Flight Timings
- Museum Timings
Omantribune Home Omantribune About Us Omantribune Advertising Information Omantribune Archives Omantribune Subscribe-Form Omantribune Jobs Omantribune Contact Us
Friday, October 31, 2014  

Egyptís ruling party mum on Mubarakís successor
CAIRO Egypt’s ruling party wraps up its annual conference on Monday with President Hosni Mubarak’s son Gamal again avoiding the key question of who will succeed his father after almost 30 years in power.

During the three-day conference, National Democratic Party leaders, including former investment banker Gamal, 44, sought to remedy the party’s image as undemocratic and run by businessmen.

Asked about the possibility of succeeding his father, a move that would prove as unpopular with the Egyptian people as it would be favoured by international investors, Gamal was evasive.

“Is there a country or a party that decides on its candidate for elections three years before they take place?” he said.

“We have a political structure and a fundamental organisation inside the party, and we also have a clear constitution and legislative structure we respect.”

Egypt’s next presidential election is set for 2011, and Mubarak senior, in power since 1981, has neither said he will not run again nor has he appointed a vice-president who traditionally “inherits” the top job.

“The designation of a vice-president would be the clearest sign of a successor,” said Issandr El Amrani, analyst with the International Crisis Group think-tank.

Gamal is associated with the pro-liberal economic reforms that have taken place under Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif since 2004.

But with Egypt’s main opposition movement consisting of the Muslim Brotherhood, foreign investors want reassurances of future stability.

“The question of succession is one of the biggest questions that’s faced by Egypt, by anyone interested in long-term business here, with an interest in what the country will be like in five or 10 years’ time,” said Amrani.

Agence France-Presse
NEWS UPDATES
Oman
Sunaidy, Rajnath sign judicial, legal cooperation agreement
Fair trial forum starts today
Pinda meets investors, promotes Tanzania
SQMC cadets get training with live ammunition
Six housing deals inked
Selection for HM Award set to start
Other Top Stories
White House computer system breached
US government buildings put on high terrorism alert
Iraq army closes in on militia-held Baiji refinery
Rocket to ISS explodes on liftoff
Obama calls on Americans to help check Ebola
Middle East
Violence pushes Libya to point of no return: UN
24,000 Gaza workers get pay in boost to Palestinian unity
Hezbollah dug tunnels to Israel, says army general
House rejects Rowhani nominee for minister again
Business
No need to panic, feels Opec
India retains top slot in most confident consumer market: Nielsen
Indian banksí soured loans rise to 3-year high
Japan factory output records biggest jump in eight months
Japan factory output records biggest jump in eight months
Sports
Mario finally breaks goal drought
Enrique unaware of Messiís painkiller
Relief for Dortmund as they cruise through
Proud father Djokovic progresses
Spurs scrape one-point win over Mavs

Sports


International

© 2013 Oman Tribune. All rights reserved. Best viewed in 800 X 600 resolution