Omantribune
Oman Tribune
Omantribune
Omantribune Search News
Web Oman
    Google Search Button
      Tribune
- Oman
- Soccer World Cup
- Other Top Stories
- Middle East
- Business
- Sports
- India
- Pakistan
- Asia
- Europe
- Americas
- Columnists
- Editorial
- Oman Mirror
- Special Features
- Cinema
- PDF Pages
- Weather
- Travel
- Currency Rate
- Hospitals
- Pharmacies
- Services
- Flight Timings
- Museum Timings
Omantribune Home Omantribune About Us Omantribune Advertising Information Omantribune Archives Omantribune Subscribe-Form Omantribune Jobs Omantribune Contact Us
Friday, November 28, 2014  

Polandís WWI veteran Stanislaw passes away
WARSAW Poland's last surviving World War I veteran, Stanislaw Wycech, has died at the age of 105, his family announced on Friday.

Wycech passed away in his sleep last Saturday evening, his daughter-in-law Zofia Wycech  said.

Worldwide, there remain only two dozen veterans of World War I.

Wycech was born into a family of Polish independence activists in June 1902 near Warsaw, in what was then the western edge of the Russian empire which, along with Germany and Austria, had carved up Poland in the 1790s.

With the outbreak of war in 1914, Poles were drafted by the three empires: more than two million served and 450,000 were killed.

Jozef Kos, who died last year aged 107, was the last confirmed imperial conscript from Poland, having been called up by Germany in mid-1918.

 Kos's death had left Wycech as the only remaining Pole to have seen service during the war, according to Polish military authorities.

Wycech had been too young for the draft, but in 1915 became a messenger with the Polska Organizacja Wojskowa (POW), or Polish Military Organisation, an underground movement seeking freedom for the country.

In February 1917, he was admitted to the POW's "adult" wing, which until July that year did not actively oppose the German forces that had driven out the Russian army.

"To be a soldier was an honour," Wycech recalled in an interview two months ago.

He was also like countless youngsters across Europe, in that his imagination was fired by tales of historical heroics.  In his case it was the Nobel Prize-winning Pole Henryk Sienkiewicz, whose "Trilogy" recounts Polish battles in the 17th century.

"In 1910, the Trilogy was serialised every week, and all those tales of warriors had an influence on young people," said Wycech.

Agence France-Presse
NEWS UPDATES
Oman
Tourism meeting to highlight opportunities for investment
NCSI introduces new smartphone apps
Zubair SEC promotes members at forum
TSC ties up with ILM to train employees
Middle East
Libyan air force behind Tripoli strikes: Thinni
Unamid asked to shut human rights office in Khartoum
Iran MPs finally okays new science minister
Baghdadi militia gain foothold in Libyan town of Derna
Baghdadi militia gain foothold in Libyan town of Derna
Sisi to focus on Libya in France
Lebanese icon Sabah dies at 87
Business
S. Arabia, UAE unlikely to push for oil production cut
Opecís other issue: Weak demand
Nigeria devalues currency as weak oil hits fisc
Goldman, BASF and HSBC in dock over metals price fixing
ECB to decide on bond buys in Q1
HP revenue drops in Q4 on weak demand
India laggard state banks face tough sell on capital raising plan
Sports
Messi breaks record, Suarez breaks duck
Hafeez inches closer to double ton
Curry scores 40 to power Golden State over Miami
I am targeting a World Cup return: Harbhajan
Rare blow but cricket a dangerous game: Lara

Sports


International

© 2013 Oman Tribune. All rights reserved. Best viewed in 800 X 600 resolution